Rap

Hip hop as music and culture formed during the 1970s when block parties became increasingly popular in New York City, particularly among African American youth residing in the Bronx. Block parties incorporated DJs, who played popular genres of music, especially funk and soul music. Due to the positive reception, DJs began isolating the percussive breaks of popular songs. This technique was then common in Jamaican dub music, and was largely introduced into New York by immigrants from Jamaica and elsewhere in the Caribbean, including DJ Kool Herc, who has been called a “founding father of hip hop”. Because the percussive breaks in funk, soul and disco records were generally short, Herc and other DJs began using two turntables to extend the breaks.

Hip hop’s early evolution into a form distinct from R&B also, not coincidentally, occurred around the time that sampling technology and drum-machines became widely available to the general public at a cost that was affordable to the average consumer—not just professional studios. Drum-machines and samplers were combined in machines that came to be known as MPC’s or ‘Music Production Centers’, early examples of which would include the Linn 9000. The first sampler that was broadly adopted to create this new kind of music was the Mellotron used in combination with the TR-808 drum machine. Mellotrons and Linn’s were succeeded by the AKAI, in the late 1980s.

Turntablist techniques – such as scratching (attributed to Grand Wizzard Theodore), beat mixing and/or matching, and beat juggling – eventually developed along with the breaks, creating a base that could be rapped over, in a manner similar to signifying, as well as the art of toasting, another influence found in Jamaican dub music.

Hip hop music in its infancy has been described as an outlet and a “voice” for the disenfranchised youth of low-economic areas, as the culture reflected the social, economic and political realities of their lives


                

The Sugarhill Gang is an American Rap music group, known mostly for its 1979 hit “Rapper’s Delight,” the first rap single to become a Top 40 hit. The song uses an interpolation of the instrumental track from the hit “Good Times” by Chic as its foundation.The members, all from Englewood, New Jersey consisted of Michael “Wonder Mike” Wright, Henry “Big Bank Hank” Jackson, and Guy “Master Gee” O’Brien. The three were assembled into a group by producer Sylvia Robinson, who founded Sugar Hill Records with her husband, record mogul Joe Robinson. The group and the record company are named after the Sugar Hill, Manhattan neighborhood.The Sugarhill Gang never again topped the US charts, though it had a slew of European hits, such as “Apache”, “Eighth Wonder” (which was performed on the American music show Soul Train in 1981), “Rapper’s Reprise (Jam Jam),” and “Showdown” (with the Furious Five). In 1999, the trio reunited and recorded Jump on It! a hip hop children’s album. The group continue to tour. “Here I Am,” a track on their album sang by Craig Derry, achieved moderate success despite not being released as a single.

Bob Sinclar collaborated with Wonder Mike and Master Gee on his 2009 release “Lala Song”. The Sugarhill Gang is also known as the Original Sugar.READ FULL STORY CLICK HERE

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